Mark Fletcher Achievements


Wingedpig.com is the home page for Mark Fletcher. Mark is an entrepreneur, investor, and software developer with over 20 years experience in software development and high tech. Mark’s career in high tech begin in the early 1980s. Since then, he has worked in several areas of computer science, including graphics, visualization and medical systems. Mark has been on the Internet since the late 1980s and is an expert on email systems and scalable Internet services.

In 1997, Mark started ONElist, a free Internet email list service. To that point, email lists had been difficult to set up and administer. Through ONElist, Mark set out to make email lists available to even novice users. As CEO, Mark raised money from CMGI and Bertelsmann Ventures in 1998. The service was the category leader from the beginning and in November 1999, ONElist acquired eGroups, its main competition. Yahoo acquired the resulting company, renamed eGroups, in June 2000. At acquisition, eGroups served twenty million active users, one million email lists, and sent out over two billion email messages a month, making it one of the largest services on the Internet. Mark served as CEO of ONElist from inception until October 1999 and was CTO until the acquisition by Yahoo.

Prior to ONElist, Mark was a Senior Software Engineer for Sun Microsystems, where he worked on web enabled set top boxes. He came to Sun through the acquisition of Diba, a Menlo Park, CA startup working to develop an embedded web surfing software and hardware system. At Diba, Mark developed key embedded web browser technologies. Previous to Diba, Mark worked for Pixel, Inc, a San Diego, CA startup as principal software engineer developing multimedia presentation systems.

Mark has appeared on ZDTV and has appeared in several newspapers and magazines, including The San Jose Mercury News, Red Herring Magazine, Upside Magazine, the Industry Standard, Salon, PC World, the New York Times, and Business Week. Mark has presented at CMGI investor conferences and has lectured at the University of San Francisco.

When evaluating new companies, Mark believes that there are a couple of keys to success:

1. The company must address a pain point, an existing or soon-to-be problem
2. The company must be run lean
3. The company must not require its customers to change their behavior in any significant way

Finally, Mark thinks that writing about himself in the third person is silly and pretentious. But he did it anyways.

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